Infographic: Medical Malpractice 101 for Nurse Practitioners

What are the most common injuries that lead to a malpractice lawsuit against nurse practitioners? What is the average payout by injury? Medical malpractice lawsuits are a reality for nursing professionals. If named in a lawsuit, what should you do? These and more questions are answered!

Frequently Asked Questions

You have questions. We have answers. (It's why we're here.)



What kinds of activities might trigger a disciplinary action by a licensing board or regulatory agency? 


The fact is anyone can file a complaint against you with the state board for any reason—even your own employer—and it doesn’t have to be solely connected to your professional duties. All complaints need to be taken seriously, no matter how trivial or unfounded they may appear. 


How does a shared limit policy work?


A shared limit policy is issued in the name of your professional business or company. The policy provides professional liability insurance coverage for the business entity named on the certificate of insurance and any of the employees of the business entity, provided they are a ratable profession within our program. Coverage is also provided for locum tenens professionals with whom the business entity has contracted for services the locum tenens performs for the business entity.

The business, and all eligible employees and sub-contractors you regularly employ, will be considered when determining your practice’s premium calculation and share the same coverage limits you select for the business.


We have a shared limit policy. Are employees covered if they practice outside our office?


The policy covers your employees outside the office as long as they are performing covered professional services on behalf of your business.

If your employees are moonlighting, either for pay or as a volunteer, they should carry an individual professional liability insurance policy to cover those services. Otherwise, they might not be covered for claims that arise out of these activities.



There are plenty more where those came from.


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Alleged failure to properly assess and monitor the impaired, restrained patient

The patient was intoxicated and aggressive when brought to the ED, and had to be restrained. Shortly after an assessment check, the patient attempted to burn off his restraints with a cigarette lighter. He suffered severe burns over 25 percent of his body, resulting in permanent disability.

Alleged improper admission orders resulting in morphine overdose and death.

Defendant is a Nurse Practitioner: The decedent patient (plaintiff) was a 72-year-old woman who had been receiving hospital care for acute back pain resulting from a fall. Her past history included chronic pain management and end-stage renal disease for which she received hemodialysis.

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist - Improper Technique When Performing a Peribulbar and/or Retrobulbar Block

Medical malpractice claims may be asserted against any healthcare practitioner involved in the care of a patient, including certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA). This case study involves a CRNA working in an ambulatory surgery center.

Failure to adequately assess and monitor the patient post operatively resulting in the patient’s death.

The decedent/ plaintiff was a 67-year-old male who underwent a right total knee replacement. Following the procedure, the plaintiff was treated in the post-anesthesia care unit where an epidural catheter was inserted for post-operative pain management.